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of us were arrested and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring them in to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 196 1963 as the new chairmanf the student non-violent committee. we met with president kennedy, who said the frustration throughout america. in 1963 we cannot because of the color of our skin. we had t to pay a tax, pass a tt because of the color of our skin and pass a vote in jelly beans in a jar. thousand of people were arrested trying to participate in the integration process. many innocent were killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28, 1963, the nation's capitol was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surroundedded this city, little stores were closed, but the march was so orderly, so peaceful it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believe in a way of peace, the way of l
's not a pretty picture. here's just one example. three men on a summer's day in mississippi. why are they smiling and what are they really up to? yes, that's former president bill clinton on the right and on the left, his best friend forever, terry mcauliffe, former chairman of the democratic national committee, fundraiser supreme for both bill and hillary, and the personification of the corporate wing of the democratic party. smack in the middle, that's haley barbour, former chairman of the republican national committee. he made a fortune lobbying for corporations, especially for the ta backco industry, then went home to serve two terms as governor of mississippi, and couldn't wait to get back to washington, where once again, he's gun-slinging for the big boys. so why did these three d.c. desperadoes ride into a small mississippi town? seems that when barbour was governor, he offered mcauliffe a very attractive state package of price and tax subsidies for a plant there to build electric cars for his greentech automotive company. mcauliffe also tapped his politically connected network for more th
on to help a student at howard and quote came out for students to go to mississippi because of the work that was going on there. i had seen some -- i had attended a deposition in washington and folk from mississippi and things they had suffered. this elderly man, hartman, talked about what happened on the bus. i was a student. all of the students were coming from all over the country. i was the black student and the student leadership at howard said we have to get there and be there with others. so i went to mississippi that summer of 1964 and i lived with a family. ms.johnson, her daughter was a teenager, june johnson and had been beaten in wynonna, mississippi. june was a strong girl. the family was strong there were about 12 children in the family. they took in three of us. two white girls and myself. host: ruth thanks for the call and thank you for sharing your story from 50 years ago. owen ullmann, we talked about your own participation. walk us through how you arrived here and why you came? guest: my parent has raised me and i'm proud of their values of stressing the importance
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
louisiana's northeast border near mississippi. alina, what you can tell us? >> reporter: zoraida, this is still a very active scene. we're going to zoom into the bank so you can see the police remain here. investigators continue to comb the bank for vefd. now louisiana state police have identified the alleged hostage-taker as 20-year-old fuaed abdo ahmed. authorities say ahmed walked into this tensas state bank with a gun and took three employees hostage-over the course of 12 you hours, ahmed made several demands, even leased a female hostage. just before midnight, local time, a s.w.a.t. team stormed the bank because the gunman, according to police, threatened to kill the hostages. ahmed was shot dead. police say he shot dead both hostages before he was killed. the man and women were taken to separate hospitals in the area. at last check, according to police, they are listed in critical condition, zoraida. >> alina, thank you very much. we'll continue to check in with you there. >>> we're going to turn now to cairo, we have majoring troubling developments overnight. police have m
that hillary cited her speech and she did cite examples were in the south, mississippi, texas, florida, south carolina. she is suggesting that since 1965 and 2013 the white people in the south are irrevocably racist and cannot be trusted. half of the country below the mason-dixon line still cannot be trusted and this is a person who wants to be president of the entire united states and this is the basis on which she's going to run to turn out as jason suggested, black voter turnout. in 2005 the federal election reform commission headed by jimmy carter and former secretary of state jim baker said that voter i. dchlt laws should be promoted because they will enfranchise black voters. she's suggesting that no one could possibly disagree with her. well, serious people do disagree with her on this. >> let me ask a political question, jason. what is the benefit for republicans pushing -- that's what they're doing -- a lot of these states are pushing this are republicans. not universally, but in north carolina the government flipped. the republicans pushed some of these laws. are they getting much o
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
they were going to do some things that they previously would never have done. in texas and mississippi, north carolina and florida, groups are already devising creative ways to make it difficult for minorities, each of us, to vote. in texas, they have already done it. this assault on freedom should be taken as seriously as you have taken anything. any changes to our voting process should be enacted to make voices heard. just simply being able to vote. i have asked the senate judiciary committee to examine these dangerous voting suppression efforts and discuss steps the senate can make to preserve the right of every senatorto cast a ballot. leahy is doing that. [applause] on the day the civil rights act was signed into law, president lyndon johnson warned the struggle for equality was not nearly over. here is what he said. "those who founded our country knew that freedom would be secure only if each generation fought." now our generation of americans have been called on to the search of justice. he is sure right. those words are written -- are a reminder to a new generation that freedom
father and sister said we cannot rest and be satisfied as long as black folk in mississippi could not vote. and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court, having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislatively codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought, bled and died for us to have the precious rights of vote. for us to now sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished, we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights act protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant tests of the black folks. paramount to martin luther king jr.'s fervent dream was the commitment that african americans gain full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility forward from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today, with 12% unemployment rates in the african american community and 38% of all children
in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 1963 with the big six as the new chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963, we could not register to vote simply because of the color of our skin. we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test, and count the number of jelly baean in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested in the south for trying to participate in the democratic process. medgar evers had been killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believed in a way of peace, the way of lov
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
to go south of richmond. just the way i was cultivated and mississippi was a scary place because emmitt till was murdered there. and i still remember ibm blacked and when we go together i wonder what people think and all day ever say is come back. i remember you from your service and never sure president. but i was a little gun shy with how i was brought up but we had a wonderful time. >> calling on the republican line. >> caller: with a race race, every time a black person kills a white person and it is o.k. but if a white person kills a black person they set out it is a race. it is not race all the time. we are past all that we need to except people who they are and quit complaining. >> guest: who is complaining? >> caller: the blacks always complain. >> guest: whitey think we're always explaining our circumstances? >> caller: they just complain get over the past. >> guest: you are from the south. you're from the south to the seveners get over the loss of the confederate war of the state's? >> caller: i am past that. the south lost. >> host: can you give us a little bit of your histor
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
the mississippi. >> sort of. >> rose: to memphis, or somewhere. >> well, i can't explain it. this is just music that touched me from the very first moment i heard it. i was very, very young, and i believe it was a willy dixon record, but i'm not sure. but i heard this sound, this sort of wonderful sliver of light broke through between a minor third and a major third-- and i later investigated what that actually means. i didn't even know it at the time. and i just-- it made me shiver. it was almost like an electric shock. and i realized this is where i wanted to live. i wanted to be in that space and hear these sounds and these stories knowing, of course, that i'm monumentally unsuited for the task. you know, i'm not from here. this is not my music. >> rose: before we talk about "house," where did you grow up? >> i grew up in ox horde, england, home of the blues-- it's not the home of the blues. ( laughs (. >> rose: maybe oxford, mississippi. >> yes, i grew up in oxford. >> rose: your dad was-- >> he was a doctor. >> rose: your moment? >> she was-- she raised four children. >> rose: of which you
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
. because of that there are still flash flood warnings and regular warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the potential for more flooding. also the threat of severe storms from southeastern montana into parts of kansas where we could end up with large hail and damaging winds. a few tornadoes are possible but they should be brief. this is most likely later this afternoon and into this evening. the plains really do not need anymore rain right now. >> absolutely. it could be a busy weather day. >>> straight ahead, the fbi let informants commit over 5600 crimes. powerball is over $400 million. >>> a frightening report of what dirty car sellers are doing that only a trusted mechanic can save you from. "first look" is back in three. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. h
and jailed in mississippi during the freedom ride. our bus was set on four in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed. but we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 1963 with the big six as the new chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963 -- we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test. count the number of jelly beans in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested and jailed throughout the south in trying to participate in the democratic process. that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington. to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. residents were told to stay home that day. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect. because we believe in the way of peace, the way of love, the way of nonviolence. people
them. some of them had to be cut on the bottom by hand. such is life on the mississippi, on -- what is the date on that? i can't read it. 1875. this book isn't that old. it's from the 20's or the 30's. i have the complete set of that edition. that is part of what got me by ian all these other books because when i found this set there were six or eight volumes missing. when i finally found out which ones were missing, i was on my way to becoming a full-fledged collector. so i finally collected all of those volumes for this particular set so it's complete. and in the meantime, i also collected several other complete sets like the one on the top which is basically the same books, they are just from a different publisher. then the ones in the middle with the yellow dust covers those are from the mark twain project in berkeley. they had been putting out scholarly editions for many years. and i have all of those. then on this wall over here are books about mark twain. also my 1601 collection this year. i'm not sure that it's appropriate for mixed company but there was a little racy story
in the united states, and not alabama or mississippi. we're talking about new york city, madison avenue. >> have you experienced it in new york? >> not as much because new york is sort of my city, and i tend to go places where i'm expected. i think in someways, i've started to do that because i don't want to have these kinds of experiences. >> so you're almost avoiding it? >> exactly. i have been, you know, passed up by a taxi driver. i've also had a taxi driver yell something foul at me -- >> both of us. >> i have been. i might be more -- >> just because i'm annoying. >> where as i've had some foul "n" word yelled at me on a new york city street. >> have you really? >> absolutely in the middle of the street. >> they aren't talking to me. it's not what they call you, it's what you answer to. i know what i am and i won't allow anybody to put me in a box. >> has it gotten better since the first black president of the united states or not? >> yeah, it's not so much that it's gotten better. i think it's become more of a conversation, and, you know, the race conversation is one that black america has
like mississippi, alabama, tennessee, will for every dollar that their citizens put into the federal coffers, those states w we have $1.20, $1.40 back on their investments. states in the north get 91 cents back on every dollar their citizens pay. new yorkers get in the line of 68 cents to 70 cents back. this is to generally sub subside programs like medicare that the south claim they hate but gobble up disproportionately. >> here we find ourselves rolling our eyes at the latest anti abortion bill or anti voting allow. paula deen among georgia republicans has better approval ratings than dr. martin luther king. do we take a poll like this seriously? >> yes. >> what do you think it means? >> specifically for paula deen, she kind of represents this pinnacle of what a lot of contemporary southerners want to feel is the new south, which is somebody who brings all the old school genteel manners and refinement and all this sort of stuff and brings with it a comp temporary viewpoint makes it so that they don't to have apologize for that, you know, slave day flag that they love to wave around
of the eight states that are highest were louisiana, mississippi, states like this. one of the things that's interesting to me is the states that ended up lowest on the list were not the most liberal or coals mott policy tan. they were the whitest states, like north dakota, idaho, and northern new england. so there's this just lingering craziness that still exist it is out there. obviously there's a tactics to the take on votes rights, but we also have to consider the possibility and i think the president is sort of considering this that we're a bit more racist than we like to think. >> we're here in new york city where the stop-and-frisk, the fact that the judge sheindlin has rule that stop and frisk is unconstitutional, hats given rights to a huge debate about whether people of color truly are treated equally. you have mayor bloomberg say this policy is good for minority communities and you have a judge who says it's unstill independents and african-americans have been saying for decades that profiling is wrong and feels wrong, and it reduces -- there's been this unwillingness to tackle
rights movement. on june 12th mississippi's naacp field secretary medgar evers was murdered outside his home. dr. king delivered his famous i have a dream speech and on july 2nd, 1964, about the johnson signed the civil rights act of 1964, the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. both dr. king and his father led the congregation at ebeneezer baptist church. the current pastor of that church reverend dr. rafael joins me. >> good to be with you tony. thanks so much. >> give us your reflections of this day and move on from there. >> it's been an exciting day and a thrilling week, as we gathered on the mall remembering that great day 50 years ago, i'm a part of the post-civil rights generation, born a decade after dr. king's death. but for americans across the nation dr. king's words that day with his soaring oratory, our right to remember it but our challenge today is to make sure that while we engage in commemoration we move from commemoration to recommitment that we ensure that we do not cash in the dream for sentimental memories, dr. king came to the capital with
white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. thank you for watching. "hardball" starts right now. >>> a question of character. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. the content of his character. remember that great line in martin luther king's speech? r
think it's like meals on wheels. you take big issues like social security. in rural areas of mississippi and alabama where there are a lot of poor people of both backgrounds black and white, they aren't on plantations. these are workers. and they really care about these basic social programs. and yet obama fights for them and they don't ally with them. >> they don't. and they think they will be better off on their own. >> i know you're friends with bill cosby and i in ways worship the guy. here's when the president didn't get away from delivering a tough message. he didn't sound like the lefty socialist his critics on the right portray him as. here he is. >> if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us claiming to push for change lost our way. the anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse making for criminal behavior. and what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all americans to work hard and get ahead was too oft
, kansas, massachusetts, maryland, michigan, minnesota, mississippi, montana, new hampshire, new mexico and washington state. >> good for mississippi. >> bill: how about that. unfortunately, there are still too many kids who are suffering from obesity. one in eight preschoolers in the united states is obese according to the cdc. a third of u.s. children and teens and still more than 2/3 of adults. so you know, we're not out of the woods yet but some good news on that front. president obama talked about this last night with jay leno and he gave some credit where i think credit is due. >> obama: to michelle's credit, the let's move initiative that she's been involved with, that has gotten so many folks all around the country doing stuff to help kids exercise and eat right, for the first time in a long time, we've started to see some modest reduction in childhood obesity. [ applause ] >> bill: very important cause that the first lady has taken on. i think she's done a damn good job of it. and she's had people in the white house. she's done videos. you know what? it's working! we just gotta
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
of free four little girls in a birmingham church and the chicago teenager on vacation in mississippi. it is a new day 50 years later and a better day, but the day is not over. today struggle for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago
was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary --ace because emmett till was because emmett till was murdered there. and yet, when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. host: michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. caller: yeah, hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who they are in good complaining -- -- quit and planning. guest: who was complaining? caller: well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- guest: why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain you know, get over what happened in the past. guest: you are from th
on the show, it's no longer them, it's us. you know, i had a farmer from the delta of mississippi. he said i want to identify myself. i'm a white listener. i'm a farmer, and i'm here to tell you we are so upset with the republicans for what they're doing, trying to tie the food stamp into the farm bill. you had bennie thompson, who said as many of the members of the caucus said for the first time in 20 years, they had to vote against the farm bill. people are seeing that these individuals are going against the best interests of their own party. >> there is no doubt about it. i'm going have to leave it there. >> yeah. adults will speak up, al. >> nia-malika henderson and joe madison, thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you, rev. >>> coming up, the gop's newest plan to go after hillary clinton. we've seen this scary movie. [ male announcer ] running out of steam? ♪ now you can give yourself a kick in the rear! v8 v-fusion plus energy. natural energy from green tea plus fruits and veggies. need a little kick? ooh! could've had a v8. in the juice aisle. >>> the gop takes th
in mississippi and make you jump through hoops. the shwag the federal government is growing isn't that good anyway and doesn't let you study a lot of different strains. it could be so simple and easy to do actual scientific research on marijuana but the government stands in the way. >> where is the obama administration on this part of the question? where has the obama administration been on the scientific question here? >> scientifically they've been great. they've said, look, we're not going to get in the way of the states. this is what they've said. the states that have passed medical marijuana laws. in practice, the d.e.a. has been kicking in doors in california, washingt washington, montana, colorado. wherever there's a medical marijuana law, there are u.s. attorneys there spending a lot of time and resources to try to tackle what they see as a problem. it takes six to nine months, a former administration official told me, to run one of these investigations on a pot shop. these pot shops are advertising in the yellowbook and in the alt weeklies and have store fronts with pot leaves on t
been covered, texas, mississippi and alabama, ushered in photo id requirements that had been previously held at bay by the voting rights act. weakening opportunities and broadening id requirements any day. and now there's florida where five counties had been covered by the voting rights act, the republican governor is restarting an effort that he says is designed to purge the voter roles of noncitizens but that a lot of people believe is an attempt to purge the roles of democrats. when rick scott tried this last year, he was stopped by the voting rights act. last time as the "new york times" reports the attempt at unearthing noncitizens initially began with a pool of 182,000 names of potential noncitizens. that was wid ld to a list of 2,600. those names were sent to election supervisors who found many were in fact citizens and ultimately the list of possible noncitizen voters shrank to 198. of those fewer than 40 had voted illegally. we'd like to remind you of one of the people who was caught in the dragnet. >> bill, a 91-year-old army veteran of world war ii who earned the bronze star
? your answer, just two. iowa and mississippi. hat tip to our friend jonathan martin at the "new york times" for that factoid. congratulations, by the way. today's winner jamie. trivia suggestion to "the daily rundown"@msnbc.com. we'll be right back. announcer ] made just a little sweeter... because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. >>> we're back now with more of the daily rundown. you heard it from mike and brad the fight over health care will be driving a lot of the conversation as soon as congress gets back to work. we learned today the obama administration is delaying another portion of the president's signature health care reform act a piece of the law that limits out of pocket costs meaning how much of their own money individuals could be forced to spend on health care another grace period before that part of the obama care would go into effect. joining us is our gaggle. karen and ann and kristen is with us. ann, ask you first. the delay comes afte
joined texas, mississippi and alabama in passing strict voter i.d. requirements, a move mrs. clinton says will usher in the old demons of discrimination. >> in 2013, so far, more than 80 bills restricting voting rights have been introduced in 31 states. now, not every obstacle is related to race but everyone who says that racial crimination is no longer a problem in american elections must not be paying attention. >> john: the speech delivered before the american bar association, the first of a series of addresses mrs. clinton plans to give this fall, each one addressing a challenge she says is undermining america's faith in government. well, hey, why wait? i'm sure she's just doing it for fun and socialization. here to talk about some of the challenges right now are cenk uygur, host of "the young turks" joining us from los angeles and from d.c., bill press, host of the "bill press show." two of the best minds in the business, my friends. i'm honored you can join us tonight. cenk, let me dive in with you first. there has been a lot of speculation about mrs. clinton's potential campaign. w
.s. senate. the answer is seven beginning in 1870 with rebels of mississippi. this year marked the first time that two ochls servafrican-amer simultaneously served in the senate and if cory booker wins next month, two african-americans together in the senate. lee is the winner! send your suggestions at msnbc.com. we will be right back. ♪ you don't have the time to hang around ♪ ♪ [ whimpers ] - hugs from beneful baked delights... - [ barks ] are crispy, oven-baked dog snacks with soft savory centers, made with beef and cheese. beneful baked delights: a unique collection of four snacks... to help spark play in your day. because all these whole grains aren't healthy unless you actually eat them ♪ multigrain cheerios. also available in delicious peanut butter. healthy never tasted so sweet. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities.. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfect
of him. they gouged out this kid's eye. it was a horrible tragedy in mississippi. >> it's so easy during this time. trayvon martin paralleled to him. you get stuck in that and not allow yourself to move forward and see how far we've come. >> there is no comparison. >> it's a baseless claim. but getting back to her in switzerland, there's a pattern here. in 2005 in paris at a hermes store -- is that how you pronounce it? >> i wear jeans and sneakers. >> the store closed. oprah wants to go shopping. they told her she couldn't. she had a hissy fit and she screamed racism. >> i thought it was true. i remember that story. i remember thinking it was horrible. >> but there's video of it. and there's a statement from the store that said this is what happened. but oprah injected race into it. >> well, again -- >> can't compare trayvon. >> i wasn't there and neither was dineen. >> but you can't compare trayvon. emetil was a rascist, vicious hate crime murder. that's not the same thing. >> a lot of african-americans, not all, certainly not all, but a lot do feel that this is a very modern day versi
's day that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. 13 people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than 13 months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the
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